Callback Phishing Scam Targets Businesses

  • By Patrick Ryan
  • Jul 14, 2022

A new callback phishing scam has victimized several digital security firms. Though the scam was limited to security firms, it has the potential to extend to other enterprises spanning several sectors and industries.

How Does the Scam Work?

The scam centers on the manipulation of targeted individuals. The manipulators instruct targets to make phone calls that redirect to harmful links. The links download malware onto the user's computer. The phishing campaign replicates what appears to be legitimate security businesses. The overarching aim of the scam is to trick targets into downloading the malware after an urgent request.

Once the call is made, and the link is clicked, the scam unfolds with the malware mentioned above. The most interesting component of this unique digital attack is that another human being is on the other side of the phone when the initial phone call occurs. On the other end, the human provides the web address for the target to access on a computer or other web-connected device.

Are There Any Other Online Scams Similar to This One?

Indeed, another similar attack was identified by CrowdStrike earlier this year. Rewind to March, and digital miscreants employed a phishing callback campaign to add AteraRMM along with Cobalt Strike to facilitate the spread of malware.

Were Any Companies Impersonated in the Scam?

The digital security researchers digging deep down into the nuances of the scam detailed above have not yet specified whether anyone impersonated other digital security specialists during the attack. A recent blog post exemplified the impersonation of CrowdStrike from the research effort in which a seemingly legitimate message was transmitted by hackers using CrowdStrike's name and logo. The phony email communicates to the target that it emanates from the business's outside security services provider. It explains that unusual activity was identified within that workstation's network. The message insists the target's IT wing has gotten word of the threat, yet user engagement is still necessary to conduct a comprehensive computer audit.

The message then directs the target to reach the customer service number. However, CrowdStrike is a professional organization that would not communicate with customers in such an amateurish manner. Aside from using common sense when receiving supposedly legitimate communication from alleged businesses, customers, employees, and others are advised to implement the industry’s latest digital security protections to safeguard their data, network, and systems. When in doubt, ask an IT specialist before clicking a shady link, contacting a supposed helpline, or even opting for annual employee cyber security training.

What Type of Malware Did Hackers Use in the Attack?

The digital security specialists researching the attack have not yet specified the type of malware used. However, there is suspicion that the malware variant uses RATs, an acronym short for remote administration tools, to obtain access and transition to lateral movement. Businesses can use off-the-shelf penetration testing tools to help search for such lateral activity. Ransomware is then transmitted to perform the extortion.

About the Author
IDStrong Logo

Related Articles

Instagram Vulnerability Allowed Hackers Access to Control Your Phone

Security experts Check Point Research discovered a critical vulnerability while examining Instagra ... Read More

Alien Malware Infects More than 226 Mobile Apps and Steals Bank Data

As reported on September 24, 2020, by ZDNet and ThreatPost, a new strain of malware named “Alien ... Read More

Universal Health Systems Hit by Ransomware Attack

Universal Health Systems (UHS), a Fortune 500 company owning more than 400 hospitals across the co ... Read More

Exchange Server Bug Exposes a Big Risk to Hackers

Months after Microsoft released a patch to fix a serious flaw in MS Exchange Server, more than 61% ... Read More

Clients’ Bank Data Exposed in Blackbaud Ransomware Attack

Blackbaud software was victim to a ransomware attack last May, and new information suggests that c ... Read More

Latest Articles

Misconfigured Database Spurs Theft of 63 Million OneMoreLead Records

Misconfigured Database Spurs Theft of 63 Million OneMoreLead Records

OneMoreLead, a business-to-business (B2B) marketing enterprise, suffered a significant data breach late last year. The marketing company left a database misconfigured, prompting the unintentional leaking of 63 million records. 

How to Prevent Data Loss from a Phone Scam

How to Prevent Data Loss from a Phone Scam

When you think of scams, you probably think of them as someone trying to trick you out of money. While data loss is typically not the primary goal of a scam, it can be the outcome.

UNM Health Data Breach

UNM Health Data Breach

The personal information of nearly 700,000 individuals was stolen in a data breach at the University of New Mexico Health. The data breach was revealed in the second half of 2021.

Featured Articles

How to Buy a House with Bad Credit

How to Buy a House with Bad Credit

Buying your own home is the American Dream, but it might seem out of reach to those with bad credit. However, the good news is, if your credit is less than perfect, you do still have options and in most cases, can still buy a home.

How Secure Is Your Password? Tips to Improve Your Password Security

How Secure Is Your Password? Tips to Improve Your Password Security

Any good IT article on computers and network security will address the importance of strong, secure passwords. However, the challenge of good passwords is that most people have a hard time remembering them, so they use simple or obvious ones that pose a security risk.

Top 10 Senior Scams and How to Prevent Them

Top 10 Senior Scams and How to Prevent Them

Senior scams are becoming a major epidemic for two reasons. First, seniors often have a lot of money in the bank from a life of working hard and saving.